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Oil Analysis of Used Perodua Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF-3) Using Spectrometric Technique

Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences
Volume 28 No. 1, December 2016, Pages 17-25

Syazuan Abdul Latip1,*, Salmiah Kasolang2, Zeno Michael1, Ahmad Naufal Adnan1
1Fakulti Kejuruteraan Mekanikal, Universiti Teknologi MARA Johor, Kampus Pasir Gudang, Jalan Purnama, Bandar Seri Alam, 81750 Masai, Johor, Malaysia
2Fakulti Kejuruteraan Mekanikal, Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
*Corresponding author: syazuan6883@yahoo.com

KEYWORDS

Automatic transmission (AT), Automatic transmission fluid (ATF), Operating mileage, Wear elements, Additive elements, Spectrometric

ABSTRACT

This paper investigates the severity level of wear metals occurred in Perodua MyVi 1300cc automatic transmission (AT) mechanism via multi-elemental spectrometric oil analysis. The work of analysis was performed merely on automatic transmission fluid (ATF) Perodua original equipment manufacturer (OEM) (ATF-3) series. The ATF was analyzed through actual operating distances. The operating mileage observed and analyzed was divided into three main categories. Category sample number (S1-S6) categorized as travelling distance (TD1) between 800km up to less than 20,000km travelling distance. Sample number (S7-S17) and (S18-S26) were each representing the operating travelling distance (TD2) and (TD3) encompassed of 20,000km up to less than 40,000km and 40,000km up to less than 60,000km, respectively. This analysis is primarily commenced based on limitations of the wear particle size that usually expressed as wear concentration in parts-per-million (ppm) unit. The typical concentration range for every element is between 1-100 ppm and the severity level of concentration for every element varies from one another. The element of Aluminum (Al), Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu), (Ferum) Fe, Lead (Pb), Nickel (Ni), Tin (Sn), Titanium (Ti), Vanadium (V), Manganese (Mn), Argentum (Ag), Cadmium (Cd) are principally categorized as the wear elements. Barium (Ba), Boron (B), Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), Molybdenum (Mo), Phosphorus (P), Silicon (Si), Natrium (Na) and Zinc (Zn) are considered as additive elements which is subject to deplete and contaminate during used. From the analysis commenced, it was observed that the elements of Fe, Cu and Al were the most significant wear elements occurred throughout each operating categories and the occurrence of oxidation to be considered minimal as the element of phosphorus increases which indicates no sign of additive depletion to occur though the ATF had been used beyond its recommended period.

CITE THIS ARTICLE

MLA
Latip, Syazuan Abdul, et al. “Oil Analysis of Used Perodua Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF-3) Using Spectrometric Technique.” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 28.1 (2016): 17-25.

APA
Latip, S. A., Kasolang, S., Michael, Z., & Adnan, A. N. (2016). Oil Analysis of Used Perodua Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF-3) Using Spectrometric Technique. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 28(1), 17-25.

Chicago
Latip, Syazuan Abdul, Salmiah Kasolang, Zeno Michael, and Ahmad Naufal Adnan. “Oil Analysis of Used Perodua Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF-3) Using Spectrometric Technique.” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 28, no. 1 (2016): 17-25.

Harvard
Latip, S.A., Kasolang, S., Michael, Z. and Adnan, A.N., 2016. Oil Analysis of Used Perodua Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF-3) Using Spectrometric Technique. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 28(1), pp.17-25.

Vancouver
Latip, SA, Kasolang, S, Michael, Z, Adnan, AN. Oil Analysis of Used Perodua Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF-3) Using Spectrometric Technique. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences. 2016;28(1):17-25.

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