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The Effect of Microbubbles on the Reduction of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME)

Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences
Volume 32 No. 1, April 2017, Pages 9-14

Azrin Camillius Tan1, Nadia Dayana Bahar1, Wira Jazair Yahya1,*, Ahmad Muhsin Ithnin1
1Vehicle System Engineering, Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Sultan Yahya Petra (Jalan Semarak), 54100 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
*Corresponding author: wira@utm.my

KEYWORDS

Wastewater, microbubbles, Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), treatment time, microbubble flowrate

ABSTRACT

Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) is a wastewater discharged from the palm oil industry. It contains large quantity of organic matter in the form of total suspended solids (TSS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), total solids (TS), oil and grease which is the major contribution to the water resources pollution especially rivers or lakes if left untreated. Raw POME has high value of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) which is more than 30,000 ppm, thus it must be treated before it can be discharged to the water resources. Therefore, this paper presents a new method of POME treatment using microbubbles. Microbubble is selected due to its high oxygen transfer coefficient at a low air flow rate that can give a major impact on reducing the BOD of POME. Thus, microbubble can be a factor on reducing the BOD of POME. The POME sample was collected and handled according to APHA standard. The duration of treatment was carried out for 120 minutes by analysing the BOD at the following time intervals; 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes with introduction of microbubble. The BOD results were measured using FiveDay Biochemical Oxygen Demand method (APHA 5210 B). The lowest flowrate of microbubbles performed better in reducing the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) with reduction of 26% of BOD at 60th minutes retention time. It is due to the lowest air flowrate produced the smallest size of microbubble whereas the bubble size is one of the key factors with significant impacts on floatation and mixing that affect aeration process.

CITE THIS ARTICLE

MLA
Tan, Azrin Camillius, et al. “The Effect of Microbubbles on the Reduction of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME).” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 32.1 (2017): 9-14.

APA
Tan, A. C., Bahar, N. D., Yahya, W. J., & Ithnin, A. M. (2017). The Effect of Microbubbles on the Reduction of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME). Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 32(1), 9-14.

Chicago
Tan, Azrin Camillius, Nadia Dayana Bahar, Wira Jazair Yahya, and Ahmad Muhsin Ithnin. “The Effect of Microbubbles on the Reduction of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME).” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 32, no. 1 (2017): 9-14.

Harvard
Tan, A.C., Bahar, N.D., Yahya, W.J. and Ithnin, A.M., 2017. The Effect of Microbubbles on the Reduction of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME). Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 32(1), pp.9-14.

Vancouver
Tan, AC, Bahar, ND, Yahya, WJ, Ithnin, AM. The Effect of Microbubbles on the Reduction of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME). Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences. 2017;32(1):9-14.

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