Potential of Staphylococcus Xylosus Strain for Recovering Nickel Ions from Aqueous Solutions

Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences
Volume 42 No. 1, February 2018, Pages 31-37

Adel Ali Saeed Abduh Algheethi1,*, Efaq Noman2, Radin Maya Saphira Radin Mohamed1, Mohamed Osman Abdel-Monem3, Amir Hashim Mohd Kassim1
1Micro-pollution Research Centre (MPRC), Department of Water and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM), 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor, Malaysia
2Environmental Technology Division, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), 1800, Penang, Malaysia
3Botany Department, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Egypt
*Corresponding author: alisaeed@uthm.edu.my

KEYWORDS

Biosorption, efficiency, factors, heavy metals, S. xylosus

ABSTRACT

The potential of bacterial biomass for the biosorption of heavy metals has investigated extensively. However, the bacterial species exhibited different affinities toward the heavy metals ions based on their differences in cell wall characteristics, structure and physiological status (living or dead cells). In this study, the potential of living and dead cells of Staphylococcus xylosus 222W for removal nickel ions from aqueous solution as a function for physiological status, nickel and biomass concentrations, time, pH and temperature was investigated. The pre-treatment of bacterial cells was performed by the heating at 100 ºC for 15 min. The removal experiments were conducted in the lab scale. The results revealed that the dead cells exhibited more efficiency in removing nickel ions than living cells at all investigated concentrations (2 to 10 mM). The biosorption efficiency (E %) increased with increasing in biomass cells to limit concentrations (0.1 to 1 g dry wt L-1). The maximum removal of nickel was 81.41 vs. 77.10 % by living and dead cells, respectively achieved after 9 and 10 hrs of the incubation period, respectively. The acidic conditions decrease the efficiency of metal removal, while the optimal removal was recorded at pH 8 for both biomass (living and dead cells). The maximum uptake capacity of S. xylosus 222W (living and dead cells) was recorded at 37°C, the percentage removed being 75.90 vs. 84.92 %, respectively. It can be concluded that S. xylosus 222W exhibited high potential and affinity to remove of nickel ions from aqueous solution.

CITE THIS ARTICLE

MLA
Abduh Algheethi, Adel Ali Saeed, et al. “Potential of Staphylococcus Xylosus Strain for Recovering Nickel Ions from Aqueous Solutions.” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 42.1 (2018): 31-37.

APA
Abduh Algheethi, A. A. S., Noman, E., Radin Mohamed, R. M. S., Abdel-Monem, M. O., & Mohd Kassim, A. H. (2018). Potential of Staphylococcus Xylosus Strain for Recovering Nickel Ions from Aqueous Solutions. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 42(1), 31-37.

Chicago
Abduh Algheethi, Adel Ali Saeed, Efaq Noman, Radin Maya Saphira Radin Mohamed, Mohamed Osman Abdel-Monem, and Amir Hashim Mohd Kassim. “Potential of Staphylococcus Xylosus Strain for Recovering Nickel Ions from Aqueous Solutions.” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 42, no. 1 (2018): 31-37.

Harvard
Abduh Algheethi, A.A.S., Noman, E., Radin Mohamed, R.M.S., Abdel-Monem, M.O. and Mohd Kassim, A.H., 2018. Potential of Staphylococcus Xylosus Strain for Recovering Nickel Ions from Aqueous Solutions. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 42(1), pp.31-37.

Vancouver
Abduh Algheethi, AAS, Noman, E, Radin Mohamed, RMS, Abdel-Monem, MO, Mohd Kassim, AH. Potential of Staphylococcus Xylosus Strain for Recovering Nickel Ions from Aqueous Solutions. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences. 2018;42(1):31-37.

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