Antioxidant Assay of Alstonia Angustifolia Ethanolic Leaf Extract

Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences
Volume 42 No. 1, February 2018, Pages 80-86

Nurhidayah Ab Rahim1,*, Noorzafiza Zakaria1, Syarifah Masyitah Habib Dzulkarnain1, Nazar Mohd Zabadi Mohd Azahar1, Mahmood Ameen Abdulla2
1Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Health Science, University Technology of MARA (Bertam Campus), 13200 Pulau Pinang, Malaysia
2Biomedical Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
*Corresponding author: hidayahr@ppinang.uitm.edu.my

KEYWORDS

Alstonia angustifolia, antioxidant assay, DPPH, FRAP, Hydrogen peroxide scavenging assay

ABSTRACT

In current study, the ability of the ethanolic extract of Alstonia angustifolia in scavenging free radicals was assessed by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) radical scavenging assay. The results suggested that the ethanolic extract of A. angustifolia leaves has a notable antioxidant activity. In FRAP assay, it showed that the extract have higher total antioxidant activity with FRAP value is 1868.33 µM/g Fe (ii) dry mass ± 0.15 than the control, quercetin with FRAP value is 1336.9 µM/g Fe (II) dry mass ± 0.12 and ascorbic acid with FRAP value is 1720 µM/g Fe (II) dry mass ± 0.02. For DPPH assay, the IC50 value of the extract is 384.77 while the IC50 value of standards of ascorbic acid and quercetin are 18.07 µg/ml and 39.60 µg/ml, respectively. For H2O2 scavenging assay, the IC50 value for the extract was discovered to be 186.77 µg/ml compared to standard ascorbic acid 466.56 µg/ml. Thus, the study suggests that A. angustifolia ethanolic leaf extract has a good origin of natural antioxidants and might be beneficial in impeding the oxidative stress progression thus averting diseases that related to free radicals.

CITE THIS ARTICLE

MLA
Ab Rahim, Nurhidayah, et al. “Antioxidant Assay of Alstonia Angustifolia Ethanolic Leaf Extract.” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 42.1 (2018): 80-86.

APA
Ab Rahim, N., Zakaria, N., Habib Dzulkarnain, S. M., Mohd Azahar, N. M. Z., & Abdulla, M. A. (2018). Antioxidant Assay of Alstonia Angustifolia Ethanolic Leaf Extract. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 42(1), 80-86.

Chicago
Ab Rahim, Nurhidayah, Noorzafiza Zakaria, Syarifah Masyitah Habib Dzulkarnain, Nazar Mohd Zabadi Mohd Azahar, and Mahmood Ameen Abdulla. “Antioxidant Assay of Alstonia Angustifolia Ethanolic Leaf Extract.” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 42, no. 1 (2018): 80-86.

Harvard
Ab Rahim, N., Zakaria, N., Habib Dzulkarnain, S.M., Mohd Azahar, N.M.Z. and Abdulla, M.A., 2018. Antioxidant Assay of Alstonia Angustifolia Ethanolic Leaf Extract. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 42(1), pp.80-86.

Vancouver
Ab Rahim, N, Zakaria, N, Habib Dzulkarnain, SM, Mohd Azahar, NMZ, Abdulla, MA. Antioxidant Assay of Alstonia Angustifolia Ethanolic Leaf Extract. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences. 2018;42(1):80-86.

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