Thermal Comfort Requirements for Different Occupants in Malaysian Hospital In-patient Wards

Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences
Volume 43 No. 1, March 2018, Pages 128-140

Waqas Khalid1,2, Sheikh Ahmad Zaki1,*, Hom Bahadur Rijal3, Fitri Yakub1
1Malaysia International Institute of Technology, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Sultan Yahya Petra, 54100 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2School of Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, National University of Sciences and Technology, H-12, 44000 Islamabad, Pakistan
3Department of Restoration Ecology & Built Environment, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Tokyo City University, 224-8551 Yokohama, Japan
*Corresponding author: sheikh.kl@utm.my

KEYWORDS

Thermal comfort, hospital ward, airconditioning, patient, thermal sensation vote, comfort temperature

ABSTRACT

It is important and challenging to provide suitable thermal comfort conditions in hospital building due to widely varying conditions requirements by different types of occupants. The precise control of temperature and humidity is vital in hot-humid ospitals as these affect diseases, infections and allergies etc. indirectly. A field study comprising of thermal environment evaluation and thermal comfort survey, has been conducted in one Malaysian hospital in-patient wards with 315 respondents. Thermal comfort requirements of patients, visitors and nurses have been investigated. The patient rooms as well as nurse workstations were found bit overcooled by patients, visitors and nurses. Thermal preference of no change by patients and visitors whereas lower temperature was observed by nursing staff in wards. A bit humid air was preferred by all respondents as mean humidity sensation vote was bit drier for all of them. The air movement was acceptable for all respondents in wards as mean percentage of acceptance for every group was more than 91%. Comfort temperatures based on operative temperature for patients, visitors and nurses have been found as 25.7, 25.5 and 23.5°C which can be used as deign guides for hospital HVAC system by local building service engineers and researchers.

CITE THIS ARTICLE

MLA
Khalid, Waqas, et al. “Thermal Comfort Requirements for Different Occupants in Malaysian Hospital In-patient Wards.” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 43.1 (2018): 128-140.

APA
Khalid, W., Zaki, S. A., Rijal, H. B., & Yakub, F. (2018). Thermal Comfort Requirements for Different Occupants in Malaysian Hospital In-patient Wards. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 43(1), 128-140.

Chicago
Khalid, Waqas, Sheikh Ahmad Zaki, Hom Bahadur Rijal, and Fitri Yakub. “Thermal Comfort Requirements for Different Occupants in Malaysian Hospital In-patient Wards.” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 43, no. 1 (2018): 128-140.

Harvard
Khalid, W., Zaki, S.A., Rijal, H.B. and Yakub, F., 2018. Thermal Comfort Requirements for Different Occupants in Malaysian Hospital In-patient Wards. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 43(1), pp.128-140.

Vancouver
Khalid, W, Zaki, SA, Rijal, HB, Yakub, F. Thermal Comfort Requirements for Different Occupants in Malaysian Hospital In-patient Wards. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences. 2018;43(1):128-140.

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