Response Surface Optimization of High Antioxidative Extraction from Curcuma Zedoaria Leaves

Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences
Volume 43 No. 1, March 2018, Pages 90-103

Siti Salwa Abd Gani1,2,3,*, Nur Fauwizah Azahar1, Nor Fadzillah Mokhtar3
1Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
2Halal Products Research Institute, University Putra Malaysia, Putra Infoport, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
3Centre of Foundation Studies for Agricultural Science, University Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM, Serdang Selangor, Malaysia
*Corresponding author: ssalwaag@upm.edu.my

KEYWORDS

Curcuma zedoaria leaves, antioxidant activity, RSM, DPPH, FRAP, BCB

ABSTRACT

Response surface methodology (RSM) has been fully utilized in this study to model and optimize the extraction conditions for maximum antioxidant compounds activity from Curcuma Zedoaria leaves. This work was carried out based on three factor/5 level of central composite rotatable design (CCRD) and three independent variables, namely extraction temperature (60-80°C), processing time (80-120min) and solvent concentration (70-90 v/v %). The experimental data was subjected to total antioxidant activity measured by the 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhdrazyl (DPPH)-radical scavenging, B-carotene bleaching (BCB) inhibition as well as ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). By using the desirability functions, the optimal conditions were found to be at temperature 75°C, 92 min and (90:10 v/v%) ethanol concentration for the highest total antioxidants values for DPPH, BCB and FRAP were 85.76%, 81.35 % and 5.08 mM Fe2+ g/DW respectively, which closely agreed with the predicted values of 87.59%, 82.29%, 5.25 mM Fe2+ g/DW respectively. Thus, indicating the suitability of the model employed in RSM to optimizing the extraction conditions.

CITE THIS ARTICLE

MLA
Abd Gani, Siti Salwa, et al. “Response Surface Optimization of High Antioxidative Extraction from Curcuma Zedoaria Leaves.” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 43.1 (2018): 90-103.

APA
Abd Gani, S. S., Azahar, N. F., & Mokhtar, N. F. (2018). Response Surface Optimization of High Antioxidative Extraction from Curcuma Zedoaria Leaves. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 43(1), 90-103.

Chicago
Abd Gani, Siti Salwa, Nur Fauwizah Azahar, and Nor Fadzillah Mokhtar. “Response Surface Optimization of High Antioxidative Extraction from Curcuma Zedoaria Leaves.” Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences 43, no. 1 (2018): 90-103.

Harvard
Abd Gani, S.S., Azahar, N.F. and Mokhtar, N.F., 2018. Response Surface Optimization of High Antioxidative Extraction from Curcuma Zedoaria Leaves. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, 43(1), pp.90-103.

Vancouver
Abd Gani, SS, Azahar, NF, Mokhtar, NF. Response Surface Optimization of High Antioxidative Extraction from Curcuma Zedoaria Leaves. Journal of Advanced Research in Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences. 2018;43(1):90-103.

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